Science of Learning

Much has been discovered over the past decade about how students learn. What are the key findings about the “science of learning” and what are the implications for teaching? What factors influence student learning, and how can teachers most effectively use classroom and homework time to ensure deep, enduring, transferable learning? Connect your practice to leading research.


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ISS Global Educator: Kevin Mattingly

Dr. Kevin Mattingly has been a science teacher, administrator, and athletic coach for 35 years in junior high and high schools. In addition, he has taught graduate courses in learning theory and its practical teaching applications for 10 years at Teachers College Columbia University. Over the years, he has helped start a school (The Mountain School, VT), been a consultant to systemic school reform initiatives, and worked with over thirty schools on curriculum design, teaching strategies, and professional development programs. He has supported a variety of summer academic programs for students, including the New Jersey Scholars, Vermont Governor's Institute on Science and Technology, Hotchkiss Summer Portals, and a number of summer enrichment programs for public school students from New York City, Philadelphia and Trenton. Beginning in the fall of 2015, he will be the director of the co-curriculum for the Riverdale School in NYC. Mattingly holds a Ph.D. in zoology and a B.A. in biological sciences from Indiana University.
 

Key Questions for Effective Teaching

  1. How does memory influence learning?
  2. What teaching strategies are most effective?
  3. How do student mindsets influence learning?
  4. How do we help students become self-regulated learners?
 

Learning Principles

Twelve learning principles compiled from recently published books and research articles.
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About the Science of Learning

Useful resources for deepening your understanding of it.
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Deans for Impact Report

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